5 results for tag: Homebuying


What Is the Smartest Way to Pay Off a Debt?

By RONDA KAYSEN MAY 27, 2017 Q. My wife took out a $30,000 personal loan from a colleague whom she would like to pay back now. To get the funds, we could either refinance the mortgage on our co-op in Jackson Heights, Queens, or take out a home equity line of credit. Given the current mortgage rates, which would be the wiser option? A. Many homeowners look to the equity in their homes to pay for things like home improvements or college tuition, or to pay off credit card debt. You can tap that equity by refinancing your mortgage or opening a home equity line of credit (often referred to as a Heloc), which works something like a credit card, ...

New Regulations Make Life More Difficult and Expensive But Mortgage Lending Goes On

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau “(CFPB”) is a new federal agency which is in charge of protecting consumers in financial transaction. Since it was formed in 2011, they have spent a great deal of time investigating and then fining mortgage banks for violations of various lending laws. Unfortunately, the CFPB has spent a lot of time fining banks and mortgage loan originators; this has not really ended up helping consumers.  It also has not hurt the lending business as much as people thought it would. Though, it did result in driving many small mortgage companies out of business which left us only with the larger companies in a ...

It is Possible to Buy a Home Now with Less than Perfect Credit and a Small Down Payment!

There’s a general feeling in the market that in order to get a mortgage now, a person has to have a credit score over 700 credit score; a very high income and a large down payment.  This can be difficult since the economy is still recovering so that high paying jobs are hard to come by. Also, due to the high cost of living, it is hard to save a lot of money in order to buy a house. But none of that is necessary.  So long as you have a job and a little money saved or available to use from some source, you can buy a home! For example, on a Fannie Mae or a Freddie Mac loan you can put down as little as 5%, and on an FHA loan, you can ...

“Don’t Buy a Home As an Investment” A Faulty Logic and Fuzzy Math

While I was reading the Sunday paper I came across this article from The Wall Street Journal and got intrigued by the title. Don’t Buy a Home as an Investment: After Costs, It Typically Doesn’t Yield Much. Think of It as a Place to Live. I always enjoy the Wall Street Journal’s columns and generally agree with them. However, in this column listed above, the author came to his conclusion first and then tried to justify it. He neglected to include several important factors and then he discounted his extraordinary return on his Manhattan apartment for no apparent reason. Read more here: Don’t Buy a Home as an Investment Dear Mr. ...

So You Want to Buy a House in 2015 (or Refinance)?

If you are looking at the mild, dry weather this winter and the low interest rates and thinking "We should look into buying a house this year," then this is for you. Likewise, if you have an interest rate above 4.25%; want to change from a 30 year fixed to a 15 year; have PMI on your loan but an increased house value; have an FHA loan with PMI of 1.35%; or want to convert an ARM to a fixed, this is for you too. But, in order to get a new loan, there are a few things that you should know.  Though some of them are "self-evident" and would appear to the untrained eye to be common sense, trust me that they are not. I would say "don't try these at ...